What role do various brain areas play in vision? – Part 2

What role do various brain areas play in vision? – Part 2

I admit this is DIY brain science, although putting together the information I found on the various brain areas described in Part 1 was very eye-opening to me. That's why I made a schematic overview of the information listed earlier and categorized them into functional groups. This schedule has many deficits in being simplistic, incomplete (because actually at least 50% of the brain is involved in visual processing) and not adequate in conveying the true complexity of the holistic brain. Nonetheless it makes up for those flaws by illustrating  in an easy intuitive way why binocular…Read more …
What role do various brain areas play in vision? – Part 1

What role do various brain areas play in vision? – Part 1

After previously writing about the basal ganglia and the crucial role they play in vision and brain plasticity, I was intrigued and wanted to understand what implications binocular vision dysfunctions have for the brain as a whole more thoroughly. In this post, part 1, I will introduce more related brain areas involved in visual processing one by one. In part 2 I want to provide a more cohesive view of what is told in part 1, a illustrative summary if you will, explaining how this relates to earlier discoveries and my own experiences…Read more …

The importance of sleep

An excerpt of 'The brain that changes itself' struck me as particularly explanatory of why proper sleep is so important to recover from visual brain damage. It also explains why not getting the amount of sleep needed or interruptions of my sleep don't just feel like a bad day but as a step closer to the abyss. So sleep certainly isn't death's cousin, not sleeping properly is... Scores of studies show that sleep helps us consolidate learning and memory and effects plastic change. When we learn a skill during the day, we will…Read more …
Youtube Book Review: The brain that changes itself

Youtube Book Review: The brain that changes itself

In 'Fixing my Gaze' Susan Barry describes the marvels that brain plasticity has brought to her life through engaging in optometric vision therapy and overcoming strabismus. It also made clear that vision is not something that can be isolated from the rest of the body or brain, since vision is the major source of sensory input and affects the way we think and everything we do. Neuroplasticity is the new Buzz word and I was wondering how far this principle goes and what implications it has, not only for vision care, but also…Read more …
Session 49: From the outside in

Session 49: From the outside in

The procedures I am doing or tools I'm using to advance are not particularly mind blowing, but results don't fail to produce themselves. It's been five months since I started to see single some of the time and that trend continues. The first twenty months of vision training I was advancing because my measured angle of disparity was diminishing but nonetheless I kept experiencing double vision 24/7. A serious neurological symptom of an acquired developmental brain injury called strabismus that was left untreated for 17 years. Nowadays maintaining single vision is still more…Read more …
If Vision Therapy were an alternative treatment, what exactly is it an alternative to?

If Vision Therapy were an alternative treatment, what exactly is it an alternative to?

Nothing annoys me more than someone calling developmental or behavioral optometry ‘alternative medicine’. What exactly is it an alternative to? Cutting into peoples eye muscles leaving them with an even greater challeng e to overcome? Too often poor eye control is blamed on the muscles surrounding the eyes and surgery is advised to alter the length of the muscles. The cause of strabismus however is at the cortical level (in the brain) and cutting the eye muscles is rarely of benefit other than in rare cases of paralysis or partial paralysis of muscles. In too…Read more …