On driving and being driven

On driving and being driven

Interesting observation: When I drive myself, actively trying to execute my Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex correctly in order to make more accurate spatial predictions and manoeuver safely, I don't get nauseous or motion sick but I do get tired fairly quickly. When someone drives me, allowing for me to ease up on the connection between my eyes and vestibular inner-ear organ, I get less tired but I do easily get motion sick. The key to solving both of these problems is to further automate and smooth out the vestibulo-ocular connection by actively, but slowly, targetting…Read more …
Reading without pain and strain is amazing

Reading without pain and strain is amazing

Finally was able to read this book! I bought it back in 2010, apparently, at that moment, still buying into the illusion that I might somehow be able to read it without torturing myself to insanity with visual strain, headaches and other kinds of pain and symptoms. An ordeal that might have taken many months, if even at all feasable, and might arguably not have been worth it. Now, having acquired the accompanying Audible version, I read in two weeks, in between of other daily activities and without pain. A nice example of…Read more …
26th Birthday!

26th Birthday!

Today is my 26th birthday! After a childhood of trying to cover up and make up for binocular vision deficits, I finally had to succumb to the fate I had been working so hard to avoid. Especially after a couple of surgeries at 16, 18 and 19, making the situation worse, there was no way around or faking my way through my visual deficits anymore. When I somehow managed to graduate at age 21 without basic reading proficiency, everything collapsed and my life regressed and sat on its ass. It's been a tough…Read more …
FAQ: How to recognize possible binocular vision issues disguised as “learning disabilities”

FAQ: How to recognize possible binocular vision issues disguised as “learning disabilities”

Some observations and tips from Angie Hammack Huskison who is an experienced Vision Therapist working at Snider Therapy Center in Columbus, Mississippi. "I meet often with teachers and administrative staff regarding our patients that are in our therapy program. I had a meeting just this Tuesday, and the teacher stated she couldn't understand why the child wouldn't complete any work on the right side of the page. I was able to explain that this child has extremely small visual motion fields (she can't see the entire page) and that light therapy will address those…Read more …
Walking and Exploring as Visual Exercise

Walking and Exploring as Visual Exercise

Over the last two years, double vision when merely sitting still has become increasingly less of a problem. Now I'm working on keeping my vision together within a moving body or while doing more cognitively taxing tasks, or a combination of those! An underrated vision exercise is taking walks. The most exhausting thing about walks for me is keeping my eyes in check. You are placing demands on your vision (exploring the environment at various distances, requiring you to make saccades, track objects, (con/di-)verge and use central as well as peripheral vision) while…Read more …
Angie H: Vision Therapy resolved my brother’s lifelong reading issues and “ADD” caused by Strabismus at age 31

Angie H: Vision Therapy resolved my brother’s lifelong reading issues and “ADD” caused by Strabismus at age 31

"No child should have to struggle needlessly in the classroom. No child should have to deal with misdiagnosis of ADD/ADHD when the underlying issue is binocular vision problems. This is a picture of my brother, who at the age of 31, found out he had a form of strabismus that had never been detected, although he had had routine eye exams for years and had 20/20 eyesight with contacts. For years my brother struggled in school and had a diagnosis of ADD. He took Strattera for years, and the medicine helped some, but it didn't…Read more …
Herb Black: Geologist turned Optometrist after 3D vision discovery

Herb Black: Geologist turned Optometrist after 3D vision discovery

"I had never had 3D vision, but didn't really know it until I was an adult. I noticed I had no 3D vision because, as a geologist, my colleagues would look at stereo pairs of aerial photos, fuse them in free space or with a viewer, and see 3D. I could not do that at all. It was a real mystery to me how they could do that, especially in free space without a 3D viewer. My daughter had binocular vision problems as a child and was helped tremendously by optometric vision therapy here in…Read more …