FAQ: Figuring out a prognosis for functional strabismus recovery

FAQ: Figuring out a prognosis for functional strabismus recovery

Having read the strabismus chapter of "Applied Concepts in VT", I've found many encouraging but also discouraging quotes. Keep in mind that I mostly read this chapter with my own case in mind. This means that factors pertaining to my own case stand out more to me. Factors that might be immensely important to other patients' cases and mentioned in the chapter are not necessarily mentioned in my list. This table of probability allows one to calculate the odds of functional recovery of a strabismic based on his or her specific characteristics. It's…Read more …

FAQ: Example of a Comprehensive Visual Processing Evaluation intake report (PDF)

Below you will find the intake report of a 58 yo female patient suffering from Convergence Insufficiency and various other visual deficiencies. This report was compiled based on two separate one hour testing sessions. The two sessions were done on two different days in order not to have fatigue skew the results.  Page 1 gives a statistical overview of how the patient did in terms of population percentile or age equivalent and whether or not this performance was adequate for healthy every day visual function. Page 2 to 5 explain what the various…Read more …

FAQ: What ocular and neurologic diseases can be masquerading as functional vision disorders?

This incomplete list was compiled using the 6th chapter of 'Applied Concepts in Vision Therapy' by Leonard Press. Use Google at your discretion.  Ocular and neurological diseases sometimes misdiagnosed as amblyopia: - craniopharyngioma - Coats' disease - optic nerve disease - optic nerve hypoplasia - glaucoma - retinoblastoma - toxo-retinochoroiditis Diseases sometimes misdiagnosed as bilateral amblyopia: - foveal schisis / foveal detachment / macular holes - retinitis pigmentosa / cone-rod dystrophy - Stargardt's macular degeneration - keratoconus Occult neurologic disease masquerading as a binocular dysfunction: - pituitary adenoma - multiple sclerosis (MS)Read more …

FAQ: How to deal with an ‘invisible’ but real vision disability?

MY ORIGINAL POST Michael Lievens "Currently, I can do almost everything a normal person can. If not, I use aids like audio assistance. The worrisome part is that no matter what activity involving a lot of eye movement, I get exhausted after two or three hours max. Then my reconversion and recovery takes quite a while, usually longer than the activity itself. Now here's the deal... How the hell am I supposed to be a reliable employee or entrepreneur like that? And if not, since I can do many things 'normally' for brief…Read more …
How do binocular vision issues interfere with participation in society?

How do binocular vision issues interfere with participation in society?

A reading disability rooted in binocular vision issues pretty much excludes one from serious academic, socio-economic and democratic participation. Reading means the crucial freedom to advance and inform oneself without being dependent on others. If the vision problem also interferes with close-up manual labour, fine visio-motor skills and driving skills, you are out of options and positioned completely outside of society without defense. Game over.  Read more …
FAQ: How to recognize possible binocular vision issues disguised as “learning disabilities”

FAQ: How to recognize possible binocular vision issues disguised as “learning disabilities”

Some observations and tips from Angie Hammack Huskison who is an experienced Vision Therapist working at Snider Therapy Center in Columbus, Mississippi. "I meet often with teachers and administrative staff regarding our patients that are in our therapy program. I had a meeting just this Tuesday, and the teacher stated she couldn't understand why the child wouldn't complete any work on the right side of the page. I was able to explain that this child has extremely small visual motion fields (she can't see the entire page) and that light therapy will address those…Read more …
What about strabismus and anxiety?

What about strabismus and anxiety?

  A few months ago I started working on a blog entry called 'Vision and the limbic system'. I was going to blast you guys away with brain regions, circuits and neurotransmitters so we'd all go tell our friends how cool this is and how  it explains everything in the known universe. So that entry was just sitting there in the draft section waiting for its Nobel Prize when our strabismic buddy Connor (21) popped this simple question: Question! Do any members of the group with strabismus experience anxiety? Do you think the…Read more …

You want more evidence? I’ll give you some evidence right here.

“Every man can, if he so desires, become the sculp­tor of his own brain” - Santiago Ramon y Cajal (1852–1934) Ever since I was four years old I've been cross-eyed (accommodative esotropia). My brain learned to suppress the image of one eye by turning the eye inwards. Over the years my visual situation changed and expensive mistakes were made. If you want to read the entire story click here. After the last surgery I had very little control over my eyes and they tended towards exotropia although that highly depended on the viewing direction.…Read more …
Orthoptists vs Developmental Optometrists: What’s the difference?

Orthoptists vs Developmental Optometrists: What’s the difference?

Orthoptists and developmental optometrists both work in the field of diagnosing, measuring and treating binocular vision problems, strabismus and amblyopia. They both use the same vocabulary to describe a problem and even often use the same tools. So why this distinction? I can only speak for certain about the situation in most European countries but I assume this must similar in other parts of the world. In the wonderful book Suddenly Successful I read a while back a fairly detailed history of this branch of vision care was provided. Somewhere during the first…Read more …