Session 66: Inferring anaglyph depth through touch, definitely not dyslexic and soupy air

Session 66: Inferring anaglyph depth through touch, definitely not dyslexic and soupy air

Our senses are inferential by nature. This means that our senses pick up on different kinds of stimuli and the brain infers a meaningful percept. Probably there's an objective reality out there but that is not what we perceive. Colors don't really exist in nature for instance, they are just distinct wave lengths of light interpreted by our brains as color. Probably because it is highly useful in finding food and recognizing predators. If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, does it still make a…Read more …

Session 41

Life after the zero degree angle. Since now I have a zero degree angle (aligned eyes) most of the time I can see a clear distinction between the time I am pointing my eyes correctly and the time I'm not. This is the 'advantage' of having double vision as opposed to suppressing the second image. Obviously I try to point my eyes properly as much as possible. The best way to achieve this is to sleep well, rest and not overdo anything. As is true for all strabismics things get harder by the…Read more …

The Fun Theory: free anti-suppression solitaire

Most cross-eyed people suppress the image of their inferior eye or alternate between eyes. The trick is to learn how to use them both at the same time in a correct way without suppressing either one or the other. One of the ways to do this is with a the red green 3D glasses and red green computer images so you have to use both eyes at the same time to see everything displayed on the screen. Most exercises like this are rather boring, you train the ability but it's not much fun.…Read more …

How a movie changed one man’s vision forever (BBC)

Bruce Bridgeman lived with a flat view of the world, until a trip to the cinema unexpectedly rewired his brain to see the world in 3D. On 16 February this year, Bridgeman went to the theatre with his wife to see Martin Scorsese’s 3D family adventure. Like everyone else, he paid a surcharge for a pair of glasses, despite thinking they would be a complete waste of money. Bridgeman, a 67-year-old neuroscientist at the University of California in Santa Cruz, grew up nearly stereoblind, that is, without true perception of depth. "When w'd…Read more …