Book Review: ‘The hidden link between vision and learning’ by Wendy Beth Rosen

Book Review: ‘The hidden link between vision and learning’ by Wendy Beth Rosen

The author of this book, Wendy Beth Rosen, was so kind to lend me an e-copy of her new book for review. As I love books and am obsessed with vision, I gladly accepted. The book reminded me of a book earlier reviewed on this website: Suddenly Successful by H. Dawkins (1989). That being the case, many of its core points were not all that new to me but they still haven't become any less relevant!  'The hidden link between vision and learning' provides a basic theoretical framework for understanding binocular vision problems and…Read more …
On dealing with double vision and the limitations of current ophthalmology practices concerning strabismus

On dealing with double vision and the limitations of current ophthalmology practices concerning strabismus

Even among people with strabismus, the ones with intractable double vision are quite rare. Most strabismics unconsciously suppress the image of one eye and often, but not always, alternate between both eyes. I also used to see like that but because of extreme studying habits slowly broke through my suppression. So I went to an ophthalmologist who suggested, as they almost always do, surgery. This exacerbated the problem since it does absolutely nothing to change the underlying neurological problem and in unlucky cases inflicts quite a lot of physical trauma. As far as…Read more …

The human visual system

"The sensory system that has been best looked at is the visual system. Primates are highly visual animals and it turns out that human beings probably have, in addition to the primary visual cortices, thirty or more other areas of the cortex devoted to vision. Let's think about what that's about... Here's this cortex that we thought of as higher order association cortex and now we find out that it's sensory in nature. Well, how do we get information about the world? We get it through our sensory systems and one of the…Read more …

The importance of sleep

An excerpt of 'The brain that changes itself' struck me as particularly explanatory of why proper sleep is so important to recover from visual brain damage. It also explains why not getting the amount of sleep needed or interruptions of my sleep don't just feel like a bad day but as a step closer to the abyss. So sleep certainly isn't death's cousin, not sleeping properly is... Scores of studies show that sleep helps us consolidate learning and memory and effects plastic change. When we learn a skill during the day, we will…Read more …
If Vision Therapy were an alternative treatment, what exactly is it an alternative to?

If Vision Therapy were an alternative treatment, what exactly is it an alternative to?

Nothing annoys me more than someone calling developmental or behavioral optometry ‘alternative medicine’. What exactly is it an alternative to? Cutting into peoples eye muscles leaving them with an even greater challeng e to overcome? Too often poor eye control is blamed on the muscles surrounding the eyes and surgery is advised to alter the length of the muscles. The cause of strabismus however is at the cortical level (in the brain) and cutting the eye muscles is rarely of benefit other than in rare cases of paralysis or partial paralysis of muscles. In too…Read more …

How does sensory development in dogs and wolves relate to behavioral optometry?

Genetically, dogs and wolves are the same species. They are able to hybridize, will happily do so given the opportunity, and the offspring are healthy and fertile. In spite of their genetic similarities, behaviourally speaking they are very different. To tame a wolf is practically impossible. Why this is when they're technically not even a separate species from "man's best friend" has long been a puzzle. Now, doctoral research by evolutionary biologist Kathryn Lord at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggests the different behaviors are related to the animals' earliest sensory experiences and…Read more …
Book Review: Suddenly Successful: How Behavioral Optometry Helps You Overcome Learning, Health And Behavioral Problems

Book Review: Suddenly Successful: How Behavioral Optometry Helps You Overcome Learning, Health And Behavioral Problems

One word: mind-boggling. Anyone with eyes should read it and honestly I had some problems curbing my enthusiasm. Having discovered about Vision Therapy through the internet and Susan Barry’s 2009 publication ‘Fixing my Gaze’ which is equally mind blowing and emphasizes the beauty and advantages of having stereovision and the brain processes involved in acquiring it for people with long standing strabismus as myself, you would think this form of life changing treatment is fairly new. Well, nothing is less true… This 1991 publication totally bursts that bubble. The main author of ‘Suddenly successful’…Read more …