FAQ: What ocular and neurologic diseases can be masquerading as functional vision disorders?

This incomplete list was compiled using the 6th chapter of 'Applied Concepts in Vision Therapy' by Leonard Press. Use Google at your discretion.  Ocular and neurological diseases sometimes misdiagnosed as amblyopia: - craniopharyngioma - Coats' disease - optic nerve disease - optic nerve hypoplasia - glaucoma - retinoblastoma - toxo-retinochoroiditis Diseases sometimes misdiagnosed as bilateral amblyopia: - foveal schisis / foveal detachment / macular holes - retinitis pigmentosa / cone-rod dystrophy - Stargardt's macular degeneration - keratoconus Occult neurologic disease masquerading as a binocular dysfunction: - pituitary adenoma - multiple sclerosis (MS)Read more …

TESTIMONIAL: KR (64) wants to improve age-related decompensation of strabismus

KR: I am 64. I first noticed there was something wrong with my vision about 5 years ago.  The first symptom was slight double vision in my right side gaze. I mentioned it to my ophthalmologist and she was not concerned at that point. We would keep monitoring it during my annual checkups. It gradually worsened but did not affect my daily life. Three years ago she sent me to a strabismus doctor (strabologist) so we could keep track of the progression. I was diagnosed with age-related decompensating esodeviation. ML: Did you have strabismus as…Read more …

FAQ: How to deal with an ‘invisible’ but real vision disability?

MY ORIGINAL POST Michael Lievens "Currently, I can do almost everything a normal person can. If not, I use aids like audio assistance. The worrisome part is that no matter what activity involving a lot of eye movement, I get exhausted after two or three hours max. Then my reconversion and recovery takes quite a while, usually longer than the activity itself. Now here's the deal... How the hell am I supposed to be a reliable employee or entrepreneur like that? And if not, since I can do many things 'normally' for brief…Read more …
FAQ: How to recognize possible binocular vision issues disguised as “learning disabilities”

FAQ: How to recognize possible binocular vision issues disguised as “learning disabilities”

Some observations and tips from Angie Hammack Huskison who is an experienced Vision Therapist working at Snider Therapy Center in Columbus, Mississippi. "I meet often with teachers and administrative staff regarding our patients that are in our therapy program. I had a meeting just this Tuesday, and the teacher stated she couldn't understand why the child wouldn't complete any work on the right side of the page. I was able to explain that this child has extremely small visual motion fields (she can't see the entire page) and that light therapy will address those…Read more …

Confusing double vision: “I often feel like being on a cruise ship during a storm”

A comment from the Strabismus World Facebook page: "I have strabismus and amblyopia. At age 38, I had my first eye muscle surgery for crossed eyes which gave me really bad diplopia (double vision). Thank you for worsening my vision, Dr Mark Steckle. Finally, 4 years later, I found a Neuro-ophthalmologist who was willing to help. He collimated or aligned my eyes as best as he could but perfection is impossible. The dominant eye became strained and releases its grip of the recessive or weaker eye and this created the diplopia. The double…Read more …
France, Meteor shower watching and Visio-Motor Training

France, Meteor shower watching and Visio-Motor Training

REMINDER: When reading on a desktop, you can have the article read to you by selecting the desired paragraph and clicking on the little speaker icon. A very good friend of mine invited me to join her and stay at her family's second home in France. The house is a skillfully renovated cowshed and is located in a remote countryside village. The walls of the house are thick as a castle's and the frame of the building has probably been there for a hundred years or more. It takes a thirty minute drive to get…Read more …
Cheiroscope: video, drawing samples and implications

Cheiroscope: video, drawing samples and implications

After a nice theoretical post, let's get down to the nitty gritty. How can we get a tangible look into how someone perceives his personal space? How can we determine inconsistent perception of space interfering with the construction of solid brain maps? As vision writes spatial equations for the muscles to solve, cheiroscopic drawing is an interesting way to gauge the state of ocular motor ability and spatial vision. During cheiroscopic drawing, one's visual system is completely stripped of contextual aids. Broader context often helps strabismics to get around and complete certain tasks…Read more …
Jaw clenching, Vision Therapy and earthquake resistant structures

Jaw clenching, Vision Therapy and earthquake resistant structures

Personally I learn a lot from reading/listening up on vision rehab and anatomy but I learn just as much from having conversations with other strabismics. I think it's a practice that could be useful to anyone with any problem. Don't compare yourself to people with a very differing, in this case neurological, background. Learn from people who are similar to you and dealing with similar day-to-day problems. What follows is a blog post constructed on this type of conversation. PASQUALE: Hi Michael, in many blog entries you mention jaw clenching. I too have…Read more …
Mark B, strabismic pilot with eyes on the skies

Mark B, strabismic pilot with eyes on the skies

Around a year ago I met Mark B. through our DIY Vision Therapy Facebook group. Every so often he'd post a picture of a little airplane or an air field on his Facebook profile. I thought he must really like planes but since he was strabismic he probably doesn't fly them himself. Turns out I was wrong! MICHAEL: Hi Mark, where do you live and how old are you? MARK: I live in the Brittish midlands, in Redditch more specifically. That's just south of Birmingham. I'm 39 years old and will turn 40…Read more …