TMJ, gross motor and vision exercise

Interestingly nowadays my most prominent symptoms related to my unbalanced vision is jaw and ear pain on my left side which is also the side with my more restrained eye. I'm trying some TMJ (temperomandibular joint) exercises from YouTube for symptom remediation and they seem to be working pretty well. Nowadays I'm doing training on three fronts: TMJ, general movement/running and specific vision stuff. My whole left side, particularly of my face, needs to get back in sync. I notice I was avoiding quite a lot of things to avoid getting this TMJ…Read more …
Research: The Effects of Sports Vision Training on Binocular Vision Function in Female University Athletes

Research: The Effects of Sports Vision Training on Binocular Vision Function in Female University Athletes

An interesting piece of research, available on the website of the US National Institutes of Health, came to my attention recently. It was published in December, 2015. It is part of a growing body of research validating the efficacy of Vision Training. I'm posting it here because it also includes some practical exercises which might inspire you to try them yourself. If you are a strabismic, make sure the risk of double vision or other adverse side effects is under control by talking to a qualified Behavioral Optometrist. URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4723179/  The Effects of Sports Vision…Read more …

FAQ: How to deal with an ‘invisible’ but real vision disability?

MY ORIGINAL POST Michael Lievens "Currently, I can do almost everything a normal person can. If not, I use aids like audio assistance. The worrisome part is that no matter what activity involving a lot of eye movement, I get exhausted after two or three hours max. Then my reconversion and recovery takes quite a while, usually longer than the activity itself. Now here's the deal... How the hell am I supposed to be a reliable employee or entrepreneur like that? And if not, since I can do many things 'normally' for brief…Read more …
The margin of error

The margin of error

Interestingly, my strabismus was developmental since the age of three but in a relatively short amount of time I lost many of my adaptations (suppression, strabismic ways of eye teaming) to cope with misalignment of the eyes. First my suppression gradually declined because of life style, i.e. overly zealous studying, and then the way my eyes moved and alternated was abruptly changed through eye muscle surgery. This left me without any reliable adaptation to deal with my abnormally developed visual system. So the only option then, is pick up the pieces and start…Read more …
Setting goals for July 2015

Setting goals for July 2015

Much of VT comes down to setting small but attainable goals for yourself and then reaching them. Then doing that again, and again, and again. Three years ago a goal would be 'any reduction of the strabismus angle is a win'. The first two years I would systematically halve my strabismus angle until I saw my first single image in years. After that, I would have to solidify by increasing binocular motility and improving my vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) so single vision can be sustained while moving. That's what I've been doing the last…Read more …

The human visual system

"The sensory system that has been best looked at is the visual system. Primates are highly visual animals and it turns out that human beings probably have, in addition to the primary visual cortices, thirty or more other areas of the cortex devoted to vision. Let's think about what that's about... Here's this cortex that we thought of as higher order association cortex and now we find out that it's sensory in nature. Well, how do we get information about the world? We get it through our sensory systems and one of the…Read more …
What role do various brain areas play in vision? – Part 1

What role do various brain areas play in vision? – Part 1

After previously writing about the basal ganglia and the crucial role they play in vision and brain plasticity, I was intrigued and wanted to understand what implications binocular vision dysfunctions have for the brain as a whole more thoroughly. In this post, part 1, I will introduce more related brain areas involved in visual processing one by one. In part 2 I want to provide a more cohesive view of what is told in part 1, a illustrative summary if you will, explaining how this relates to earlier discoveries and my own experiences…Read more …