On driving and being driven

On driving and being driven

Interesting observation: When I drive myself, actively trying to execute my Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex correctly in order to make more accurate spatial predictions and manoeuver safely, I don't get nauseous or motion sick but I do get tired fairly quickly. When someone drives me, allowing for me to ease up on the connection between my eyes and vestibular inner-ear organ, I get less tired but I do easily get motion sick. The key to solving both of these problems is to further automate and smooth out the vestibulo-ocular connection by actively, but slowly, targetting…Read more …
Pursuing a higher degree of visual freedom

Pursuing a higher degree of visual freedom

In my last blog entry I talked about 'visual reserves' and how important this concept is for long term comfort and for VT to be successful. The improvement of eye lens focusing and eye movement amplitudes individually is not enough for it to stick. You need to be able to execute those visual skills simultaneously, effortlessly and automatically. Another great illustration of this processes by Dr Maino is shown below. Mastering those skills paves the way for further consolidation and visual/sensory development of the brain. Check out the entire slide show for more…Read more …
Why and how can text-to-speech programs be helpful to some strabismics?

Why and how can text-to-speech programs be helpful to some strabismics?

It is only recently that I started appreciating the value of text-to-speech programs and there's a couple of good reasons for that. - Not all text-to-speech programs are created equal. You have to find the right one. I'm not in the business of making publicity for anything but I think the program I'm using deserves to be mentioned. TextAloud is available in English, Spanish and some other European languages. Especially when combined with an optional 'natural voice' it proves to be enjoyable to work with. - My vision had to reach a certain…Read more …
Book review: Fixing My Gaze by Susan Barry

Book review: Fixing My Gaze by Susan Barry

After I read 'Fixing My Gaze' for the third time in three years I decided to write a long overdue review about the book that got this whole VT party started. I first read it during the summer of 2010. At the time I was undergoing all kinds of personal, academic and medical crises and I realized I was on my own. So I turned to the oracle that is Google and went looking for better alternatives to help me get rid of my double vision. This time in English. I discovered Vision…Read more …
Session 60: An unconscious reflex to many, a giant leap to a strabismic

Session 60: An unconscious reflex to many, a giant leap to a strabismic

Yesterday I had my 60th vision therapy session since I embarked on this mission almost three years ago. Things are as good as can be expected given my history. Expectations have already been exceeded several times and things are still getting better so objectively there shouldn't be any reason I can't get this monkey off my back if I keep strong. A few examples of how far we've already come: - After 20 years of accommodative strabismus and 6 years of them with double vision 24/7, I have eye alignment and single vision…Read more …

The importance of sleep

An excerpt of 'The brain that changes itself' struck me as particularly explanatory of why proper sleep is so important to recover from visual brain damage. It also explains why not getting the amount of sleep needed or interruptions of my sleep don't just feel like a bad day but as a step closer to the abyss. So sleep certainly isn't death's cousin, not sleeping properly is... Scores of studies show that sleep helps us consolidate learning and memory and effects plastic change. When we learn a skill during the day, we will…Read more …